Abreva (Docosanol)

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Abreva 10%/2gm

Product of Canada
Manufactured by: GlaxoSmithKline Inc.
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Abreva 10%/2gm
Product of Canada
Manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline Inc.
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Abreva (Docosanol) Cold Sore Medication

Abreva is an antiviral drug for treating cold sores affecting the face and lips. This medication stops the virus from spreading to the surrounding cells, and also expedites the healing process. It will also alleviate the pain, itching, burning or tingling you experience with a cold sore.

Abreva is manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline Inc, and ships from Canada. We offer it in one dose, which is 10%/2grams. The cost starts $35 USD for a tube.

This is an over the counter (OCT) medication, but you will still need to set up an account to place an order. This can be done by simply selecting the medication and adding it to your cart, and following our simply check out process. For assistance please try our chat feature.

What is Abreva Used For?

This is a medication used to treat people who suffer from bouts of cold sore infections. These are triggered by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). Also known as Docosanol, Abreva cures the condition quickly, shortening the treatment time. If you are having cold sores on your lips or face, Abreva is one of the best treatments to use. Besides treating HSV-1 infections, Abreva can be used for any other purpose your doctor might recommend.

How is Docosanol Recommended to be Used?

It is imperative to take your medication exactly as your doctor recommends. So don’t take a larger or a smaller dose than necessary. Additionally, if you forget the right instructions read the drug label or contact your doctor. It is a topical rather than an oral medication. As soon as you notice a cold sore on the face or lips the medication should be applied. Once you notice that your skin is tingling, itching, reddening or developing sores, apply Abreva.

Being a smooth cream, it dries up without leaving a trace. It does not sting or burn; it has no specific taste or smell. To ensure that Abreva works as needed, avoid wearing makeup at first. Next, wash the areas being treated as well as your hands. Dry them and then apply a small amount. Ensure that you cover your sores with the cream, prior to rubbing it in gently and don’t place it in your mouth or eyes. Abreva should be applied five times every day until the cold sores disappear. If you notice that the sores are worsening, or remains the same way after ten days of daily application, discontinue use and call your doctor. Apply once again if you note that the medicine is accidentally removed. Once it has dried, apply your cosmetics over Abreva with a different applicator. This will keep the infection from spreading.
If you forget to apply Abreva, do it the soonest you can recall. If a friend or relative has herpes simplex cold sores, don’t give them your medicine to cure it. Have them get their own appointment with the doctor and get their prescription.

As cold sores are highly contagious prior to, during and after an outbreak, avoid kissing, or getting intimate with uninfected persons. This will prevent spreading of the virus.

Are there Side Effects?

Abreva might trigger some side effects, although the odds are low. The ones you can tolerate include just a headache, yet it rarely happens. If you notice a skin rash or hives, itching, difficulty breathing or swollen face, tongue or lips, call your doctor immediately.

What are the Precautions?

To ensure that you can safely take this treatment, there are some precautions you should take. First, inform your doctor about the following:

• Your pregnancy or plans to conceive. As the effects on Abreva on unborn fetuses have not been established, it’s best to avoid taking it.
• That you are breastfeeding in order to keep your baby safe
• That you want to treat a child. Kids below twelve years should avoid Abreva
• That you are using some prescribed or non-prescribed medication. Let your doctor know about your vitamins and supplements too. This will help them determine if taking this medicine and your current drugs could be harmful.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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